Feeders

Filters

Categories

BEE FEEDERS

 

What is a Bee Feeder?

A bee feeder is the equipment that is used for providing the bees for additional resources if they are experiencing a shortage in their own supply. The feeder is essential for sustaining the bees during the brief and specific situations when it is required. This is usually not a common occurrence but when it does, beekeepers need to intervene to ensure that the bees do not starve to death.

Why and when do you need a Bee Feeder?

The bee feeder is required by the bees only during specific situations. It is recommended that you have to assess whether the bees actually need the extra hand because they are pretty self-sufficient and using a bee feeder must only be used as a last resort when their resources are actually insufficient or rapidly depleting.

Generally, there are two situations in which feeders must be used; when a new colony is being established and when winter is coming. When a new colony is being established, feeders have to be used because they still do not have any resources. Bees will always make sufficient storage of honey during the summer and fall in preparation for winter

Types of Bee Feeders

There are quite a number of different types of honey bee feeders. Each will have its pros and cons, so it’s ultimately up to you to determine which one suits you best. To help you, we have described below the different types of bee feeders and where they are most helpful.

  1. Open Air Feeders

 As the name implies, these are left out in the open, the idea being that bees can forage by them. They are also known as hanging bee feeders. The intention might be noble, but the consequences are dire. They are the most insecure and tend to attract all types of wildlife including: wasps, skunks, bears, birds, possums, raccoons, and many others.

In terms of safety, these feeders are not safe for the bees since it encourages the transmission of diseases, parasites, and pests. There is also a tendency for bees on open feeders to fight over sources of food and fight off invaders. This drastically weakens the bees and eventually leads to weak hives. Though these types of feeders are effective, they should be avoided by all means possible.

  1. Entrance Feeders

Entrance, or Boardman, feeders are the most affordable and popular feeders. They consist of two parts: an inverted syrup container placed outside the hive and a tray for feeding placed at the hive entrance

The main advantage is that they fit well into hives. They are quite easy to monitor and does not disturb the bees when checking or refilling the syrup.

Disadvantages, however, are that they’re not designed to last in the cold months since the syrup will freeze, and they can’t hold as much food as other feeders. Sun exposure can make your feed spoil faster, and there’s also a risk of contamination due to other bees or insects having ease of access. It can also be invaded by robber bees since it lies on the entrance to the hive.

 

  1. Division Board or Frame Bee Feeders

This type of feeder is usually made out of plastic and has the same size as a brood frame which then acts as its replacement. They are ingenious designs that are situated inside the hive. These feeders are ideal for keeping robbers and invaders off the bee syrup.

One of their advantages is their ability to hold a large amount of sugar syrup or honey which, on the other hand, also means that they take a longer time

Disadvantages include bees drowning in them all the time. If they’re left empty, bees will overtake them and fill them with comb. Leaks are a common occurrence, and they’re difficult to move.

  1. Hive-Top Feeders

Internal hive-top feeders fit between the brood boxes and the cover of your hive. They can hold a great amount of syrup and can be refilled with ease. They are also immune from invasion because it is well placed on top of the hive where only the bees can access it. A problem here, though, is that bees can drown in them. They’re also quite heavy and can make a big, sticky mess.

An external hive-top feeder is inverted over the entrance hole. You’ll have to keep it covered if you don’t want intruders, or if you want to hold it in place. They’re large containers that can also hold a lot of food but can be heavy and difficult to move. One of the problems associated with external hive-top feeders is that they pose a great risk of slipping during rainy days and this may spoil the entire hive. You can use plastic pails instead since they are easier to use.  This type of feeder is mostly used by commercials beekeepers.

  1. Baggie Feeders

These are simply plastic bags that are placed inside a spacer rim in your hive. Once you have properly positioned the sugar bag in the slit, you can cut it out open and the liquid will come out. The bees will then take a sip out of it. This is considered to be the safest way of feeding the bees and ranked best to use as a bumble bee feeder

It is also extremely difficult for the syrup to freeze since cluster of bees keep it warm even during the cold seasons. It is also easy to add mite treatments with the syrup since the rims are expansive. Bees can also easily feed on it without drowning

On the downside, the plastic bags in baggie bee feeders are used once and need to be disposed. This is not environmentally friendly. This can also be expensive since you buy a new one every time.

 

BEE FEEDERS AND FOOD

Bee food

Bees are most commonly seen when they are foraging- which is the process of finding food and water. They are attracted to sugars and may be liquid sweets. Most bees use pollen and nectar from flowers to feed to the larvae and other members of the colony.

Honey bee feed can provide food when natural supplies are not available. Pollen, Bee Pollen Substitute, and Pollen Patties are fed if spring is chilly and the natural pollen flows are delayed or interrupted.

When to Feed Bees?

There will be times throughout your hive’s life when you need to help them along a bit with extra sustenance. You may need to supplement your bees’ feed during the following situations:

  1. Fall and spring

Check your hive in fall and early spring to assess their stock , as these transition periods can also be hard on your bees.

  1. Hive Illness

If your hive is a little under the weather, due to sickness or mites, for example, they will be weak and production will slow. Providing food for your bees is extremely important in this situation

  1. Low Pollinating Plant Population

Environmental factors can affect the availability of pollen. For example, wildfires and droughts may make it difficult for bees to seek out pollen and store any honey.

What to Feed Bees?

  •  Honey

Honey is the best bee food. But never used purchased honey, because it can introduce diseases and contamination to your hive! Beekeepers sometimes set aside dark, strong-colored or other “off” honey to feed to bees in an emergency.

You can save honey in your freezer if your bees have produced enough during the foraging season. Simply take frozen frames of honey and deliver them to your hive if you believe they need a little extra food.

  1.  Fondant

Fondant and sugar candy can be fed in winter if it is too cold for sugar syrup and if it is an emergency. Your bees will find the sweet, stiffened syrup, and draw enough energy to make it through the tough times.

  • Pollen Patties

Bees need protein, so you can also feed them pollen patties if necessary. You can purchase them or make them from a dry powder. Grease patties are great for combating mites, especially throughout the winter when it is inadvisable to treat your bees by other methods.

What is a Bee Feeder?

A bee feeder is the equipment that is used for providing the bees for additional resources if they are experiencing a shortage in their own supply. The feeder is essential for sustaining the bees during the brief and specific situations when it is required. This is usually not a common occurrence but when it does, beekeepers need to intervene to ensure that the bees do not starve to death.

Why and when do you need a Bee Feeder?

The bee feeder is required by the bees only during specific situations. It is recommended that you have to assess whether the bees actually need the extra hand because they are pretty self-sufficient and using a bee feeder must only be used as a last resort when their resources are actually insufficient or rapidly depleting.

 

How to Feed Bees?

You can use a variety of types of feeders to feed your bees, just make sure that the type you choose is appropriate to the climate and the needs of your bees. Some feeders work better than others. A bee hive-top feeder made of an inverted pail with some small holes punched in the center of the lid works well.

Bee feeders that can be placed inside the hive – with another box around the outside temporarily are easy to use. Internal feeders do a better job of feeding your bees fast because those in the hive get all the food.

To make a posting you need to login first.

Login

If you don't have account yet, you can register here!.

Register